Monday, January 31, 2011

Must-read interviews

I know I haven't been posting a lot lately...things have been busy! In the meantime, be sure to check out these great screenwriter interviews:

Movieline: Elizabeth Meriwether, writer of No Strings Attached
"There’s definitely a little bit of fear about putting some sex into a rom-com - I think there’s some assumption that women only want to see movies about weddings, you know? And I think they want to see movies about weddings and sex."

GoIntoTheStory: Greg Russo, writer of Down (his first spec sale)
"I never took a screenwriting class, nor attended a lecture or anything like that and barely read books. You can learn everything you need to by buying the screenplays to your ten favorite films and studying what made them so effective on paper to begin with."

The Hollywood Reporter: Aaron Sorkin, writer of The Social Network
“We started at 100 miles an hour in the middle of a conversation, and that makes the audience have to run to catch up,” Sorkin says of the film’s talky opening sequence. “The worst crime you can commit with an audience is telling them something they already know. We were always running ahead.”

The New York Times: Carlton Cuse, co-creator of Lost
"We wrote and produced as many as 25 hours of Lost in a single year. As an artist, if you succeed in making something fresh and new, it often looks easy: Warhol’s soup cans, for instance. And when you make it fast, it seems even easier. A tortured novelist who takes seven years to write a book gets cut a lot of slack. But if you are capable of producing a well-honed hour of filmed entertainment every eight days, how big a deal can it be to come up with a new idea?"

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2 comments:

Jared Reise said...

I hear myself think
"I would like to be like Greg"
And it makes me smile.

:)

Dan Williams said...

I'd like to be like Greg, too! He studied his favorite scripts and was able to teach himself the craft, and then, over a three year period, wrote eight scripts that honed his craft. The number eight seems right to me. Gotta write eight to get one produced.